Articles

This section contains a variety of articles written by HeartMath staff that can be reprinted.

The articles in this section may be reprinted in their entirety in print media, e-newsletters, websites and blogs, or may be used as handouts. Permission to reprint is contingent on the inclusion of the attribution statement found at the end of each article. HeartMath retains all rights to the content of each article unless otherwise stated. Said content may not be modified or altered without written permission from HeartMath Public Relations department. Requests to use these articles in contexts not stated here must be submitted to HeartMath Public Relations department for approval. Please send all requests to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Tips for Better Sleep

Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

Articles - Health & Well-Being

Last Updated on Thursday, 09 February 2012 13:10 Written by HeartMath Thursday, 09 February 2012 11:41

Tips for Better Sleep

#1 The number one tip for better sleep:

Put stress in check. One of the first symptoms of stress overload is disrupted sleep. Stressful feelings throw our inner rhythms out of sync and have a negative carryover effect on hormonal and nervous systems – making it difficult to sleep. You can try other sleep tips, but if managing stress isn’t a priority, other strategies have less chance of helping you get the quality sleep you need.

Create emotional ease on demand. Techniques designed to release emotional stress during the day can have a positive carryover affect that benefits sleep. With practice you can create an inner ease as you need it.

Try this simple technique. Quick Coherence® can help reset your inner rhythms. Three easy steps can improve your skill at releasing stress as you move through your day. Also, try it before bedtime to bring your mind and body into balance. Try it out here.

Measure your inner rhythms. There are devices that can help individuals reset their inner rhythms and provide immediate feedback that use lights and audio cues to help you unwind and rebalance. Some devices also offer simple practices such as the Quick Coherence technique. The combination guides you into a balanced state for a restful night.

#2 Eat right and get regular exercise:

Light exercise in the evening can help release tension without over stimulating the body. Try simple yoga postures or gentle stretching exercises to help you unwind. As little as ten minutes can be beneficial and help promote sleep.

Save the caffeine for morning. Believe it or not, caffeine can cause sleep problems up to ten hours after drinking it. Consider eliminating caffeine after lunch.

Avoid large meals at night. Try having your dinner earlier in the evening and avoid heavy, rich foods within two to three hours of bed as they use a lot of energy to digest.

Try an herbal nightcap. Instead of alcohol before bed try some chamomile tea, which has relaxing and soothing properties. Alcohol can reduce sleep quality and possibly even contribute to waking you up later in the night.

#3 Regulate your sleep schedule:

Keep a regular sleep schedule. This is an important strategy for good sleep hygiene. Try to go to bed and get up at the same time each day. Try to maintain your usual sleep time and wake–time even on weekends so you build consistency into your routine.

Recharge with a nap. Limit naps to 20-30 minutes and try and get them in in the earlier part of the afternoon so you don’t throw off your sleep routine.

#4 Create a relaxing night time routine:

Carve out some wind down time. At an hour or two before bed stop stimulating activities such as being on the computer or watching TV. Instead, opt for quieter things such as reading, knitting, taking a bath or listening to soothing music.

Soothing sounds help prepare you for quiet. If you live in a noisy area with sirens, barking dogs, city traffic, etc., camouflage the noise with a fan or perhaps a CD of nature sounds. You might also try a sound machine with white noise. Good-old-fashion earplugs can also be helpful.

Check your thermostat. The ideal sleeping temperature for your bedroom should be around 65° F. A room that is too warm or too cold can affect your quality of sleep. Also make sure you have good air flow and ventilation. A fan on low can keep the air gently moving, which prevents the room from getting stuffy.

 

Sleep Better Now: 3 Ways Your Heart Can Help | The Huffington Post

Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

Articles - Health & Well-Being

Last Updated on Thursday, 09 February 2012 13:10 Written by Doc Childre and Deborah Rozman, Ph.D. Monday, 18 January 2010 07:45

It can be just plain harder to sleep these days even when we try. People's stress levels are on the increase and that also means stress hormones are changing our sleep patterns. We are overloaded with too much to do, or over-stimulated with too much we'd like to do. Either way, the result is the same. If we don't get enough sleep, it builds up until we're exhausted, mentally foggy, irritable and running on empty emotionally.

 

Read more: Sleep Better Now: 3 Ways Your Heart Can Help | The Huffington Post

 

Tips To Prevent Holiday Stress And Avoid Faking The Holiday Spirit | The Huffington Post

Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

Articles - Stress

Last Updated on Friday, 06 August 2010 08:42 Written by Doc Childre and Deborah Rozman, Ph.D. Wednesday, 16 December 2009 08:14

User Rating: / 2
PoorBest 

The holidays are here and, for many of us, so is holiday stress. Reduced budgets can mean stressing more this year over how much to spend on gifts and what to get. Planning parties or family gatherings can feel overwhelming. It can be hard to find the holiday spirit. Here are some tips to prevent stress through the holiday season.

Read more: Tips To Prevent Holiday Stress And Avoid Faking The Holiday Spirit | The Huffington Post

   

How To Increase Your Resilience Factor | The Huffington Post

Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

Articles - Health & Well-Being

Last Updated on Friday, 06 August 2010 11:22 Written by Doc Childre and Deborah Rozman, Ph.D. Monday, 16 November 2009 08:46

User Rating: / 2
PoorBest 

Are your emotions spinning out of control more often? Do you find that inconveniences, impatience and frustration are getting to you, and you aren't able to let it all go like you once could? Do you feel tired or drained just thinking about your day and everything you need to get done? If you answered yes to any of these symptoms, it may be due to a lack of emotional resilience.

 

Read more: How To Increase Your Resilience Factor | The Huffington Post

 

The Big Elephant In The Room Of Health Care Reform | The Huffington Post

Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

Articles - Health & Well-Being

Last Updated on Friday, 06 August 2010 11:43 Written by Doc Childre and Deborah Rozman, Ph.D. Thursday, 03 September 2009 08:46

We just attended a health care telephone town hall meeting with our Congresswoman, Anna Eshoo (San Jose, California). It was a more civilized process than a live meeting, controlled by a telephone moderator who, with a touch of a key pad, could turn questioners on and off and let Rep. Eshoo speak. Even so, it seems odd to have started these town hall meetings before the public has been clearly informed in writing, for all to read, on exactly what the various health care reform proposals actually are.

Read more: The Big Elephant In The Room Of Health Care Reform | The Huffington Post

   

Page 1 of 3

 

Copyright © 2014 HeartMath LLC. All Rights Reserved.