Workplace Stress

Positive attitude at work may reduce stress

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News - Workplace Stress

Sunday, 16 January 2011 16:00

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Positive attitude at work may reduce stressEmployees who suppress positive attitudes at work drain themselves of energy and end up with more negative feelings regarding their job and organization, according to a recent study by researchers from Rice University, Purdue University and the University of Toronto.

Some professionals - like journalists, doctors and law enforcement officers - are obligated to retain a neutral demeanor in order to do their jobs. However, the study showed that in a customer service position, participants who were asked to suppress their positive emotions had poorer employee performance and experienced higher workplace stress.

Employers in industries like medicine or law enforcement where a straight face is required may be able to counteract these negative feelings through employee wellness programs. Studies have shown that regular exercise combats stress, so a workplace gym or gym membership could help professionals in these fields. An article on the Atlanta Business Chronicle website says fostering open communication, honesty and encouragement are key things bosses can do to help workers. It also suggests implementing a company sports league to build morale and support systems.

Individuals who do not work in fields that require a poker face may want to keep in mind that a positive attitude can be contagious. The study showed that customers who interacted with happy employees rated the organization better in the end.

Whatever the job description, studies have shown stress to be detrimental to health and productivity. Employee wellness programs are available to combat stress and help support a company's bottom line. 
 

Employers hold the key to reducing workplace stress

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News - Workplace Stress

Thursday, 13 January 2011 16:00

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A study by the American Psychological Association reveals that three quarters of Americans are stressed out, with 70 percent of respondents saying work is the cause of their worries.A study by the American Psychological Association reveals that three quarters of Americans are stressed out, with 70 percent of respondents saying work is the cause of their worries. In addition to providing wellness programs, bosses and managers can take small steps toward a lighter work environment and enhanced employee performance.

Employers should be mindful of their own actions, remain aware of sources of stress around the office, be positive about wellness programs and encourage employees to take personal time to create a balanced workplace, according to an article on NuWire Investor's website.

Research has shown that employees sometimes mimic their managers' reactions to stressors. This could mean that a happy, stress-free boss will shape workers with a similar demeanor.

Employers should also be able to communicate with employees regarding sources of stress in the workplace. Communication and observation are key in deciding whether changes should be made to avoid conflicts, the news provider further reports.

Finally, personal time to refresh is essential to a happy employee. Companies should make sure workers are taking allotted vacation time and consider using unoccupied office space as a break area.

Small steps toward a stress-free workplace make excellent supplements to wellness programs and can help boost employee performance. 
 

Study: Women at greater risk for stress-related neck pain

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News - Workplace Stress

Thursday, 06 January 2011 16:00

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Women are at greater risk for stress-related neck pain, study saysProlonged workplace stress is known to cause physical symptoms such as fatigue or body aches, and some people may be more prone to them than others. In fact, according to a recent Swedish study, stress-related neck pain is a common occurrence, and it affects female workers more than their male colleagues. 

In one part of the study, the researchers distributed questionnaires to more than 800 professionals who used computers at work. They found that the women respondents experienced more neck and upper back pain, regardless of their occupation. Moreover, the pain was related to psychosocial factors, such as the stress related to every day work duties.

The study's author, Anna Grimby-Ekman, a postdoctoral student at the University of Gothenburg, says that while the association between physical work - such as heavy lifting - and pain is clear, her research has begun to shed light on some of the mental reasons for muscle pain among those whose jobs are less physically demanding.

The American Psychological Association reports more than 30 percent of Americans are living with extreme stress, and almost 48 percent think their stress levels have increased in recent years.

However, it has also been shown that women who practice yoga postures, breath control and meditation recover from stress faster than those who do not, according to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. To facilitate such outcomes, some companies offer employee health benefits that cover wellness programs. 
   

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